Integrative Medicine for Back Pain

In All, Back Pain, Treatments by Blaine MitchelLeave a Comment

Massage

You can’t beat a good massage if you want to relax. There is plenty of scientific evidence which shows that massage goes further than to relax you, it can help alleviate chronic and acute back pain through the release of natural pain-reducing chemicals. Massage originates from Chinese medicine. Just like acupuncture/acupressure, it’s been practiced as a healing method for thousands of years. In the late nineteenth century, it became popular in the Western world thanks to a Swede named Per Henrik Ling.

There numerous types of massage, or modalities. Most are variations of the Swedish massage, which composes of four main techniques: stroking, tapping, kneading, and friction (essentially small circular movements). Pressure differs depending on the patient’s needs. It is very important that you communicate well with your massage therapist during sessions. Good therapists can tell if the pressure is too much, they’ll feel your muscles tense up more. However, they’re not mind readers. If it hurts, let them know. In contrast, it you want more pressure, say so too.

Massage is usually done while you are nude; however, some people do prefer to leave on their underclothes. The therapist leaves the room while you undress and re-enters once you are on the massage table covered with a sheet. The therapist will only uncover the area of the body which is being massaged. Scented or nonscented oil is spread over to the skin to help the therapist massage your body. If you have allergies, ask the therapist about the products which they are using.

The massage room should be warm and dimly lit and maybe with some relaxing music. Once again, communication with the therapist is a good idea. Relaxation is very important in releasing tense muscles and you can’t do it if you’re annoyed by some environmental aspect.

Shiatsu is a modality which combines acupressure with massage. You lie on a soft mat whilst wearing loose clothes. The therapist works on your body’s meridian points with their fingers, knuckles, elbows, and sometimes feet. It’s likely that they will conduct a thorough interview asking you about your lifestyle and specifics regarding your back pain.

A good therapist will conduct a thorough health interview (also referred to as an intake) and keep your chart on file. They will also inform you of important tips worth knowing for when the massage begins, as well as for afterwards. It will probably require numerous sessions in order to find maximum benefit, but what an enjoyable way to bring relief to your body! Therapeutic massages are frequently covered by many insurance policies, but you’ll need an appointment from your doctor. Also, you may be restricted to particular massage therapists. As always, find out about the particulars of policy benefits before assuming you’re covered.

Leave a Comment